Cleveland from Two Wheels. Because travel remains limited by the… | by Cleveland Museum of Art | CMA Thinker | Sep, 2020

Cleveland from Two Wheels. Because travel remains limited by the… | by Cleveland Museum of Art | CMA Thinker | Sep, 2020

Marc LefkowitzDirector, The Cleveland Green School, Cleveland State University Levin College of Urban AffairsWhen I need to decompress, I take a bike ride that explores the green city, the blue lake, and the revitalization that has started to reshape Cleveland. I never tire of my 20-mile roundtrip route that combines the best of nature and city. There are leafy neighborhoods such as Tremont and Glenville. I see great green spaces such as Rockefeller Park and the Cleveland Cultural Gardens, with homage to peace, unity, and brotherly love. I love the tall trees, Doan Brook, sculpture, and gorgeous gardens leading to the natural crown jewel, Lake Erie. I’m mesmerized by the lake and its many shades of blue, dotted with white sailboats and host to the father and son fishing off the E. 55th Pier. It’s such a strange contrast to the Shoreway with its cars whizzing by at 65 mph. Once downtown, I head straight to the Flats and the new Centennial Lake Link Trail. It offers incomparable views: industrial silos, kayakers, cone-shaped piles of grey ore, long tanker ships, and jackknifed bridges all jostle for space on the crooked river. My destination is Clark Field, a USEPA Superfund site being reclaimed by nature, thanks to the Clean Ohio Fund. Fields of wildflowers frame the steel mill. It’s amazing to see the transformation of Cleveland’s burning river. Consider the 1911 painting View of a Factory from American artist Albert Bloch in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. I imagine mill workers in Cleveland walking home after their shift to neighborhoods like Slavic Village, where my great-grandfather operated a saloon and lived above it with his family. I grasp to understand what life in the gloom of pre-Clean Air Act Cleveland must have been like. How did it feel to be scorched and enobled by that mighty furnace and a plume that crowded out the blue sky in the industrial valley? The river freely flows in that valley once again. I am grateful for the fire yet glad to keep it in the past.Left: Uploaded photo to ArtLens AI. Right: Romance of the Three Kingdoms, 1800s. Matsumura Goshun (Japanese, 1752–1811). Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk; image: 28.2 x 25.2 cm. The Cleveland Museum of Art, John L. Severance Fund, 1987.35Like these bicyclists, you can connect your life to the CMA’s collection. ArtLens AI: Share Your View is a reverse image search tool that recognizes the shapes, patterns, and objects in your own photos to find surprising and delightful matches from the CMA’s encyclopedic collection. The tool may notice you are in the same location as a famous painting! Make fun matches on our website or go to Twitter and attach an image to your tweet and mention @ArtLensAI; the Twitter bot will automatically reply with a matching artwork from the CMA.


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